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Vincent Kling Wins the 2022 Wolff Translator’s Prize for ‘The Strudlhof Steps’

Vincent Kling has been announced as this year’s winner of the Helen & Kurt Wolff Translator’s Prize for his NYRB Classics translation of Heimito von Doderer’s novel The Strudlhof Steps. Administered each spring by the Goethe-Institut, the award comes with a prize of $10,000. Read more

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There’s a new lit fest in town: American Writers Festival

As downtown Chicago creaks slowly, slooooooowly, back to where it was before the pandemic, the American Writers Museum on Michigan Avenue has grown antsy. Its fifth-year anniversary was approaching, though like other cultural attractions, attendance had thinned. So in true big city rent-party fashion, they decided to invite everyone over. Read more

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The Mysterious Romance of Murder

“This is a masterwork in which Lehman’s encyclopedic knowledge of film, literature, and cultural history is synthesized by way of lively exegesis, quotes, poems (his own), catalogs, mini-biographies, and eclectic, brilliantly illuminated byways, both classical and pulp. His vivid, chromatic style is what one expects from a poet and critic of Lehman’s stature. The Mysterious Romance of Murder must take a prominent place, stylistically and critically, alongside Luc Sante’s Low Life, Julian Symons’s Bloody Murder, and Cyril Connolly’s The Unquiet Grave. As with the very best mysteries—of the heart and the intellect—you can’t put it down.” – Nicholas Christopher

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The Rediscovery of a Lost Black Playwright

The playwright Alice Childress, who lived from 1916 to 1994, never saw her work produced on Broadway. Unlike some of her Black contemporaries—Lorraine Hansberry, August Wilson—she wasn’t canonized or widely taught. In her later years, “she felt like she had been forgotten,” the dramaturge Arminda Thomas said the other day. Lately, though, Childress has been remembered. This past winter, her 1955 play, “Trouble in Mind,” about an actress navigating backstage racism, made its long-awaited Broadway début. And, this month, Theatre for a New Audience is staging her drama “Wedding Band” at the Polonsky Shakespeare Center, in Brooklyn, its first New York production in half a century. Read more

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