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Andy Serkis is bringing this 1996 Elizabeth McCracken novel to the big screen

…the 58-year-old “King of Post-Human Acting” will direct a movie adaptation of Elizabeth McCracken’s acclaimed literary romance, The Giant’s House. A 1950s-set love story about “a little librarian on Cape Cod and the tallest boy in the world,” McCracken’s debut novel was a National Book Award finalist back in 1996 and received rave reviews in The New Yorker, The San Francisco Chronicle, Salon, and elsewhere. Adding to the star-wattage of this project, Oscar-nominated novelist and screenwriter Nick Hornby will pen the script. Read more

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The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures: A True Tale of Obsession, Murder, and the Movies

With a spellbinding, thriller-like presentation supported by painstaking research, Fischer puts forth evidence to try to unravel the mystery of Le Prince’s life and death. Deftly organized facts, coupled with the technical minutiae of filmmaking, reveal fascinating details of Le Prince’s life and the challenges faced in his work, while also exposing the mysterious circumstances surrounding his disappearance. Fischer’s stellar, suspenseful narrative is a work of art unto itself that finally gives Le Prince–and the impact of his often overlooked, cut-short creative genius–his due. Read more

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Camera Man: Buster Keaton, the Dawn of Cinema, and the Invention of the Twentieth Century

In this thoughtful, engaging, and moving work, Slate writer Stevens posits that Buster Keaton’s life is an entry point to understanding the 20th century—and vice versa … Stevens’s acumen and analysis further elevate this book, offering insights and entertaining extrapolations on the myriad films and entertainment figures discussed within … More than a biography of Buster Keaton, this is a stunning, extensively researched, and eminently readable cultural history. Read more

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101 Greatest Screenplays of the 21st Century

“As voted upon by the members of the Writers Guilds West and East, the list of the 101 Greatest Screenplays of the 21st Century (so far) is both a celebration of the great writers and screenplays of the last 21 years and a study of how writing for the screen has evolved and diversified since the 20th Century.” Read more

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Quentin Tarantino Turns His Most Recent Movie Into a Pulpy Page-Turner

Tarantino isn’t trying to play here what another novelist/screenwriter, Terry Southern, liked to call the Quality Lit Game. He’s not out to impress us with the intricacy of his sentences or the nuance of his psychological insights. He’s here to tell a story, in take-it-or-leave-it Elmore Leonard fashion, and to make room along the way to talk about some of the things he cares about — old movies, male camaraderie, revenge and redemption, music and style. He gets it: Pop culture is what America has instead of mythology. He got bitten early by this notion, and he’s stayed bitten. Read more

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N.K. Jemisin Book Series ‘The Broken Earth’ Lands At Sony’s TriStar In 7-Figure Deal; Author To Adapt

Each book in Jemisin’s series — The Fifth Season, The Obelisk Gate and The Stone Sky — won the Hugo Award for Best Novel, making Jemisin the first person to win the award three years in a row and the first person to win for all three books in a trilogy. Read more

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