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The home of Frankenstein author Mary Shelley is on sale for £1million

Michael Keating, Director of Dexters Bloomsbury says of the property: This bright first floor flat offers buyers the opportunity to purchase a piece of history in one of London’s most historic neighbourhoods. Close to Russell Square tube station and King’s Cross, Marchmont Street has a wide array of pubs, cafes and second-hand bookstores. Read more

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Barnes & Noble booksellers reveal book of the year: ‘magnificent and deeply original’

Singer and songwriter Paul McCartney’s book “The Lyrics” is Barnes & Noble’s Book of the Year for 2021 … Begun in 2019, Barnes & Noble’s books of the year are nominated by booksellers across the nation and then narrowed to eight titles by a selection committee. The booksellers then vote on the eight titles for their favorite of the year. Read more

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Man exonerated in 1981 rape of author Alice Sebold after film project finds discrepancies

A rape conviction at the center of a memoir by award-winning author Alice Sebold has been overturned because of what authorities determined were serious flaws with the 1982 prosecution and concerns the wrong man had been sent to jail. Read more

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Einstein manuscript with relativity calculations sold for more than $13M at Paris auction

A rare manuscript featuring early calculations that led to Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity sold for just over $13 million at an auction in Paris Tuesday, becoming the most expensive manuscript by the famed scientist. Read more

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The real-life demons that drove Dostoevsky to write his masterpiece

The creditors whom Kevin Birmingham relied on to write “The Sinner and the Saint” — a dexterous biblio-biography about how “Crime and Punishment” came to be born — include a formidable array of scholars as well as Dostoevsky himself. Yet the biographer betrays no sign of panic. The tale he tells is rich, complex and convoluted, and though he must have struggled in constructing it, Birmingham writes with the poise and precision his subject sometimes lacked. (Though it worked out all right for him.) Read more

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